You better hold fast

fer1972:

Make Love, Not War: Collages by Mister Blick

bantarleton:

asbury71:

bantarleton:

seasoned-fan-girl:

bantarleton:

feistyphocion:

joachimmurat:

mademoisellelapiquante:

The Patriot - 2000

Oh, the look of horror when one realizes tey’re trapped in a Mel GIbson movie.
"Does this mean that crimes perpetrated by German soldiers in the Second World War are instead going to be carried out by inaccurately costumed British soldiers in 1770’s America?""I’m afraid so.""God help us."

"With an unrealistic amount of candles everywhere."

In the months since seeing that film I have realised literally every historical drama has TOO MANY DAMNED CANDLES 

One of the reenactors told me about the nightmare it was to work on set at times.  Gibson wouldn’t have anything to do with anyone, and they had been told not to say a word to him.  The reenactors had brought period cannons, but Roland Emmerich (the director) said they didn’t make enough of a bang, and so, he commissioned a larger cannon be made.  When it arrived on the flatbed truck, he insisted that the test firing be made, and to put an unrealistically large amount of powder in it.  The cannon held, but the recoil destroyed the cab of the truck.
On a good note, Jason Isaacs, who plays Tavington, was a warm and wonderful person with a great sense of humor, and a go-to attitude (even after an accident had him hurtling over the head of his horse, and onto the ground).  The reenactors really enjoyed working with him, as well as hanging out with him, which he did a lot of.

I enjoy the irony that real-life Jason Isaacs is more like Ban with his charm. Also, I heard that reenactors deliberately turned their heads away from the pan flash in their muskets in an effort to make the film even more inaccurate. A gallant protest. 

I had several friends who worked on the film in York County, SC. According to them the larger cannons were cast fiberglass and after several discharges the barrels cracked, but they were patched and were still used anyway.
Probably the most laughable part of the whole movie was when the “freemen” were “liberated” (read: drafted) on Mel Gibson’s farm. The audience I was in at the theater openly howled and laughed at the notion of an entire farm in SC during the 1770s being tilled entirely by “freemen .”
When all is said and done, I think some of the best commentary is from Dr. Walter Edgar, Professor Emeritus at the University of South Carolina — probably the foremost authority on state history and a consultant on the movie. He said, “Is it a GREAT movie? No. But, if it gets people discussing the American Revolution and leads to more undergrads coming into my classes with even a cursory knowledge of the war, then I can live with it.”

Yeah, there is a great irony to the Patriot - without it I wouldn’t have become interested in the war (Britain has all-but forgotten it) and I certainly wouldn’t have discovered Ban. I would have done my University’s final year History dissertation on someone or something else, and probably would have gotten a lower grade. So in a way it did help. But I still don’t think it’s worth the tens of thousands of people who don’t do any more research and take the film as fact. It ruins the work we do as historians. 

bantarleton:

asbury71:

bantarleton:

seasoned-fan-girl:

bantarleton:

feistyphocion:

joachimmurat:

mademoisellelapiquante:

The Patriot - 2000

Oh, the look of horror when one realizes tey’re trapped in a Mel GIbson movie.

"Does this mean that crimes perpetrated by German soldiers in the Second World War are instead going to be carried out by inaccurately costumed British soldiers in 1770’s America?"
"I’m afraid so."
"God help us."

"With an unrealistic amount of candles everywhere."

In the months since seeing that film I have realised literally every historical drama has TOO MANY DAMNED CANDLES 

One of the reenactors told me about the nightmare it was to work on set at times.  Gibson wouldn’t have anything to do with anyone, and they had been told not to say a word to him.  The reenactors had brought period cannons, but Roland Emmerich (the director) said they didn’t make enough of a bang, and so, he commissioned a larger cannon be made.  When it arrived on the flatbed truck, he insisted that the test firing be made, and to put an unrealistically large amount of powder in it.  The cannon held, but the recoil destroyed the cab of the truck.

On a good note, Jason Isaacs, who plays Tavington, was a warm and wonderful person with a great sense of humor, and a go-to attitude (even after an accident had him hurtling over the head of his horse, and onto the ground).  The reenactors really enjoyed working with him, as well as hanging out with him, which he did a lot of.

I enjoy the irony that real-life Jason Isaacs is more like Ban with his charm. Also, I heard that reenactors deliberately turned their heads away from the pan flash in their muskets in an effort to make the film even more inaccurate. A gallant protest. 

I had several friends who worked on the film in York County, SC. According to them the larger cannons were cast fiberglass and after several discharges the barrels cracked, but they were patched and were still used anyway.

Probably the most laughable part of the whole movie was when the “freemen” were “liberated” (read: drafted) on Mel Gibson’s farm. The audience I was in at the theater openly howled and laughed at the notion of an entire farm in SC during the 1770s being tilled entirely by “freemen .”

When all is said and done, I think some of the best commentary is from Dr. Walter Edgar, Professor Emeritus at the University of South Carolina — probably the foremost authority on state history and a consultant on the movie. He said, “Is it a GREAT movie? No. But, if it gets people discussing the American Revolution and leads to more undergrads coming into my classes with even a cursory knowledge of the war, then I can live with it.”

Yeah, there is a great irony to the Patriot - without it I wouldn’t have become interested in the war (Britain has all-but forgotten it) and I certainly wouldn’t have discovered Ban. I would have done my University’s final year History dissertation on someone or something else, and probably would have gotten a lower grade. So in a way it did help. But I still don’t think it’s worth the tens of thousands of people who don’t do any more research and take the film as fact. It ruins the work we do as historians. 

kernalmustache:

padalickingood:

oliviatheelf:

This actually kind of scared me when I first saw it and it sank in.

#i thought this was about the skeleton war again

is it not?

kernalmustache:

padalickingood:

oliviatheelf:

This actually kind of scared me when I first saw it and it sank in.

is it not?

wolvensnothere:

hotladypants:

This show.

WEARING HATS INDOORS.

ras-kolnikova:

Wandering Beasts by John Kenn

sickstreetwear:

image

Since the start of Sick Streetwear, I’ve received a lot of followers, and great feedback from you all. Thanks a million for that!

I know it’s usually just photo posts here, but I’ve been receiving one specific question so many times that I decided it’s time to answer it once and for all. I…

myimaginarybrooklyn:

nemfrog:
Plate XV. Tattoos of a French sailor and deserter (lower figure). The Criminal. 1901.

myimaginarybrooklyn:

nemfrog:

Plate XV. Tattoos of a French sailor and deserter (lower figure). The Criminal. 1901.

the-altar:

You are looking at an “aerial oblique shot of a Redwing H-Bomb detonation on a barge at Bikini atoll.” Operation Redwing was a ”United States series of 17 nuclear test detonations from May to July 1956. They were conducted at Bikini and Enewetak atolls. The entire operation followedProject 56 and preceded Project 57. The primary intention was to test new, second-generation thermonuclear devices […] Redwing demonstrated the first US airdrop of a deliverablehydrogen bomb—test Cherokee.” (x)

the-altar:

You are looking at an “aerial oblique shot of a Redwing H-Bomb detonation on a barge at Bikini atoll.” Operation Redwing was a ”United States series of 17 nuclear test detonations from May to July 1956. They were conducted at Bikini and Enewetak atolls. The entire operation followedProject 56 and preceded Project 57. The primary intention was to test new, second-generation thermonuclear devices […] Redwing demonstrated the first US airdrop of a deliverablehydrogen bomb—test Cherokee.” (x)

talesofwar:

A free French legionnaire is drinking near Bir Hakeim, 1942. Water supplies was a huge concern in this desert in the middle of nowhere.

talesofwar:

A free French legionnaire is drinking near Bir Hakeim, 1942. Water supplies was a huge concern in this desert in the middle of nowhere.

Tony Porter: A Call To Men
"Tony is the original visionary and co-founder behind A CALL TO MEN: The National Association of Men and Women Committed to Ending Violence Against Women. He is the author of "Well Meaning Men...Breaking Out of the Man Box - Ending Violence Against Women" and the visionary for the book, NFL Dads Dedicated to Daughters.

Tony's message of accountability is welcome and supported by many grassroots and established organizations. He’s currently working with numerous domestic and sexual violence programs, the National Football League, the National Basketball Association, colleges and universities around the country. He has worked with the United States Military Academy at West Point and the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis.

Tony is an international lecturer for the U.S. State Department having worked in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, United Kingdom and Brazil. In addition, he has been a guest presenter for the United Nations' Commission on the Status of Women and has been a script consultant for Law & Order: Special Victims Unit." - (x)